Ohm’s law calculator

Resistance

Result x

To Calculate:  

Current:  

Amps

Voltage  

Volts

Resistance:  

Ohms
Decimal Place

Power

Result x

To Calculate:  

Current:  

Amps

Voltage:  

Volts

Power:  

Watts
Decimal Place

Ohm’s Law calculator online is a free, quick, and simple Ohm’s law calculator. Calculate resistance between any two points in a circuit with our easy-to-use Ohmic resistance calculator (resistance calculator). The Ohm’s law equation that links current, voltage, and resistance is defined as the following: ‘Current = Voltage / Resistance’ (the unit of measure for voltage is ‘Volt’, the unit of measure for resistance is ‘Ohm’). Current flow through a circuit depends on the supply voltage and resistance. Ohm’s Law determines the current flowing through a conductor between two points in an electric circuit.

Ohm’s Law can be used to calculate the current in a circuit – the current flowing through a circuit will be inversely proportional to the resistance.

Use Ohm’s Law calculator (resistance calculator) to calculate current – enter either the voltage or resistor, depending on which one you know, and solve for the other. Use Ohm’s law calculator (ohms formula) to calculate resistance from either the supply voltage or the existing resistance value.

Conductance and Admittance Calculator for DC circuits: In an AC circuit the Advanced Resistivity factors will vary in their values depending on the frequency of the signal passing thru them. But if you want to calculate voltage or current after a resistor, capacitor and inductor are connected in series (it is called RCL circuit). To calculate the voltage across a resistor, use the formula (V = IR), where V is voltage, I is current and R is resistance. The same technique can be applied to capacitors in parallel or inductors in series.

Circuit Theory Calculators: If you are only interested in calculating one value and do not need to compare values then try our other Ohms Law calculators. We have a separate Ohm’s Law calculator (Resistance, Voltage, and Current) to calculate any of the 3 variables in an AC circuit or for DC circuits.

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